Basic Scones

For me, the mention of fresh baked scones sends me straight back to my childhood. Since I became wheat free and then later on lactose free, scone eating became a relic of the past. I’ve tried a couple of times to bake them myself over the years (read about it here if you’re interested) but it was only very recently that I finally had success. The original recipe for this came from a free magazine given out at either Coles or Woolworths, but I can’t remember which because I’ve long since ripped it out. I’ve adapted the recipe to suit myself.

This recipe is simple and has bucketloads of potential which I will be exploring in the very near future. For now, we’re going to focus on the simple, delicious treat that is a plain scone. Unfortunately I am yet to find an easy solution for lactose free cream that can be whipped (I’ve had a few suggestions but they mostly involve coconut milk which is totally not my thing) so my scones have butter and jam on them instead. For anyone wondering, that’s my Grandad’s home made plum jam in the picture and it is fabulous. Yum. I have been making these a lot for lunch, as a little effort mean I can feed myself and both kids fresh food straight out of the oven (plus cooling time of course).

Rustic Scones ready to go in the oven

Rustic Scones ready to go in the oven

The biggest note I will make here, the *most* important thing about scone dough is the way you mix it. Get yourself a blunt butter knife and when the recipe says so, cut the milk into the flour. You heard me. Use a cutting motion, as if you are slicing a piece of bread. It will seem silly at first, but trust me when I say if you stir the milk in, your scones will be rocks. If you cut it in, they will work. Keep up the cutting motion until the dough is formed, which takes slightly longer but is totally worth the effort.

Another thing worth mentioning is the shape of the scones. I’m lazy, so I don’t roll them out and use a cutter. When my dough is formed, I get some flour on my hands, grab a handful out of the bowl, pat it into a roundish shape and put it on the tray. They’re rustic scones and I’m happy with them that way. I’m also intensely paranoid about over-handling the dough and wasting all the effort I spent cutting the milk into the dough. However, if rolling/patting the dough out and using a cutter is your thing, then go for it – just beware of overhandling.

Fresh out of the oven, nicely golden

Fresh out of the oven, nicely golden

I’ve written this recipe out three times, so yes you are seeing triple when you scroll down. This is just to help with quantities, because I bake different sized batches according to how many people I need to feed. I could make you half and then quarter the recipe yourselves, but that would just be mean, wouldn’t it? So all the below recipes are the same, except the ingredient ratios have been changed to allow for serving different amounts of people. I often make the tiny serving at lunch time and it feeds me and the two kids. The medium serve is enough for two adults and two littlies, whilst the largest serve is what you want if you’re having a lot of guests.

In regards to baby led weaning, I just serve the scones to Piper cut in half and spread with toppings. She licks all the jam and butter off first and then finishes the rest! If you end up with leftovers, then these scones are freezer friendly. Wait until they are cooled (but not too long or they will dry out) then wrap them in foil and stick them in the freezer. When you’re ready to eat, unwrap the scone, put it on a plate and microwave for about a minute (do it in intervals just in case your microwave is different to mine) until it’s nice and warm. Yum!

As always, if you need any help with substituting ingredients, check out my substitution guidelines.

Ready to eat!

Ready to eat!

Basic Scones - Large Batch

  • Servings: 12 scones
  • Time: Approximately 45 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 3 cups gluten free SR flour
  • 80g butter, chopped
  • 1 and 1/4 cup of milk

Directions

  1. Preheat your oven to 200 degrees celcius (or 180 if you have a fan forced oven) and line a baking tray with baking paper.
  2. Scoop your flour into a bowl. Add the butter and use your fingertips to rub it into the flour until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.
  3. Make a well in the center of the flour and pour the milk in. Take a flat bladed butter knife and using a cutting motion, slice through the milk and flour continually until a dough forms. I sometimes find it helps to rotate the bowl at regular intervals, but this is a personal choice. If the dough isn’t holding it may be a little dry, add a splash of milk and keep cutting until it comes into a ballish shape.
  4. When the dough is formed, rub your hands in flour and use the knife to scoop out a handful of dough. Pat it between your palms a few times to make a roundish shape, then place it on the baking tray. Repeat until you have used all the dough.
  5. Put the scones into the oven for twenty minutes, then check. They should be golden and well risen. If not, give them a little longer – cooking times can vary from oven to oven.
  6. Cool for a few minutes on a wire rack, and serve warm with your choice of toppings.

Notes

Adjust the ingredients to suit your dietary requirements. I use normal butter due to the low lactose content, and lactose free milk. However, these work just as well with a butter substitute (such as Nuttelex) and a different type of milk, such as soy. Try it with what suits your needs, and enjoy!

 

Basic Scones - Medium Batch

  • Servings: 6 scones
  • Time: Approximately 45 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 1 and a 1/2 cups gluten free SR flour
  • 40g butter, chopped
  • 1/2 cup of milk, plus a bit extra

Directions

  1. Preheat your oven to 200 degrees celcius (or 180 if you have a fan forced oven) and line a baking tray with baking paper.
  2. Scoop your flour into a bowl. Add the butter and use your fingertips to rub it into the flour until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.
  3. Make a well in the center of the flour and pour the milk in. I find that 1/2 a cup is normally not enough, you will need a splash more (or 1/8 of a cup if you want to be super technical). You can either add this milk before you mix or you can add it when you need to. Take a flat bladed butter knife and using a cutting motion, slice through the milk and flour continually until a dough forms. I sometimes find it helps to rotate the bowl at regular intervals, but this is a personal choice.
  4. When the dough is formed, rub your hands in flour and use the knife to scoop out a handful of dough. Pat it between your palms a few times to make a roundish shape, then place it on the baking tray. Repeat until you have used all the dough.
  5. Put the scones into the oven for twenty minutes, then check. They should be golden and well risen. If not, give them a little longer – cooking times can vary from oven to oven.
  6. Cool for a few minutes on a wire rack, and serve warm with your choice of toppings.

Notes

Adjust the ingredients to suit your dietary requirements. I use normal butter due to the low lactose content, and lactose free milk. However, these work just as well with a butter substitute (such as Nuttelex) and a different type of milk, such as soy. Try it with what suits your needs, and enjoy!

 

Basic Scones - Small Batch

  • Servings: 3 scones
  • Time: Approximately 45 mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cups gluten free SR flour
  • 20g butter, chopped
  • 1/4 cup of milk, plus a bit extra

Directions

  1. Preheat your oven to 200 degrees celcius (or 180 if you have a fan forced oven) and line a baking tray with baking paper.
  2. Scoop your flour into a bowl. Add the butter and use your fingertips to rub it into the flour until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.
  3. Make a well in the center of the flour and pour the milk in. Take a flat bladed butter knife and using a cutting motion, slice through the milk and flour continually until a dough forms. I sometimes find it helps to rotate the bowl at regular intervals, but this is a personal choice. If the dough isn’t holding it may be a little dry, add a splash of milk – but just a little one as this is a small quantity – and keep cutting until it comes into a ballish shape.
  4. When the dough is formed, rub your hands in flour and use the knife to scoop out a handful of dough. Pat it between your palms a few times to make a roundish shape, then place it on the baking tray. Repeat until you have used all the dough.
  5. Put the scones into the oven for twenty minutes, then check. They should be golden and well risen. If not, give them a little longer – cooking times can vary from oven to oven.
  6. Cool for a few minutes on a wire rack, and serve warm with your choice of toppings.

Notes

Adjust the ingredients to suit your dietary requirements. I use normal butter due to the low lactose content, and lactose free milk. However, these work just as well with a butter substitute (such as Nuttelex) and a different type of milk, such as soy. Try it with what suits your needs, and enjoy!

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One thought on “Basic Scones

  1. Pingback: Mama’s Magical Cookery Compendium | The Impractical Parenting Almanac

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